Stony Plain road report finds bulk of paved paths to be mediocre

The Pavement Quality Index or PQI collectively for roads in the town was found to total 55 out of a possible 100 points.

A portion of road in Stony Plain stands closed for construction in summer 2019. A report presented at the council meeting Monday found the collective quality of all roads in town was 55 out of a possible 100 points. File photo

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If you are driving on a paved road in Stony Plain odds are it is in need of some future loving and caring maintenance.

This was one of the key takeaways from a report presented during the council meeting in the community Monday. According to the document the Pavement Quality Index or PQI collectively for roads in the town was found to total 55 out of a possible 100 points. This assessment from MPE Engineering Ltd. out of Edmonton was lower than a Transportation Association of Canada analysis that had a PQI of 65. Officials said they now know there is a large load of roads requiring bumps, cracks and other issues to be smoothed over.

“The data indicates there is a backlog,” Ian McKay, general manager of Planning and Infrastructure said. “The recent allocation of about $2.1 million from the municipal stimulus funding to 49th Avenue and Golf Course Road will improve the arterial road score (65) in the future.”

The report also noted that about 27 per cent of roads in the town were in need of total rehabilitation (the costliest option), 42 per cent were in need of restoration (the second costliest) and 31 per cent were in need of preservation (the least costly choice). The report was ultimately accepted as information and no action was taken. Mayor William Choy said it was illuminating and a good path toward the future in the area.

“This was a great way to understand what we may be fixing, repairing and replacing,” he said. “I love the idea of maximizing our tax dollars. If we have the road assessment along with others about utility pipes. We can pair those so we can replace each at the same time. It makes no sense to work on a road and then end up digging it up later so we can work on a line. I am glad that the presentation pointed that out.”

epretzer@postmedia.com

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